Past Works – Saretta Art & Design

Past Works

The following is a collection of previously sold artworks. If there is an artwork that captures your attention, you can commission me to replicate any of these past artworks and customise it to compliment your home or office. Colour, size, symbols, texture and story can be developed to your requirements to create your own exclusive Saretta Artwork. Please click on the commissions tab to get started.

  • Ngurakaali (Creation - Awabakal) series 1

    This vibrant earthy toned artwork depicts the creation of country. The rolling lines rise up and move across the canvas, representing the formation of mountains, valleys and waterways. The central image of Biami, symbolised by three unbroken circles is the focal point and from this central place the artworks spirals outward and off the canvas depicting the enormity of creation and the strength of a powerful Biami.

  • Konara (Clan – Awabakal) series 2

    This piece tells the story of coming together as a family across the generations and extended family clan groups. A gathering of people, Elders, fathers, mothers and children at a family event or celebration. The three main textured symbols in the centre depict the Elders who are held in high regard by all and giving priority at all gathers.

  • Konara (Clan – Awabakal) series 3

    This artwork tells the story of Clan/family and life’s journey. Encircled in orange the key figure of the work is a mother giving birth to and embracing her children, who flow outward and further away as they grow and make their own way, although, forever connected. Strong and vibrant vertical lines woven though out the backdrop symbolise the many song lines, journey trails, experiences and pathways taken by each family member and how they cross and intermingle with each other as they each follow their life’s journey. Soft and brilliant yellows, both boldly represented and subtly, woven within the piece portrays the father, whose influences and values touch every part of each child. Brilliant blues hues used in this work represent the country in which the family were raised, close to (Ninkinpa) Lake Macquarie and the East Coast. This artwork won second prize at the 2015 Singleton Art Prize

  • Konara (Clan – Awabakal) series 4

    This vibrant and highly texture work depicts family connection and relationship across the generations. Highly valued within Aboriginal community, family past, present and future are depicted in the (3) meeting circles that move up and diagonally within the piece. Connected by songlines or journey trails the circles expand outward, symbolic of extended family ties and representative of the strong relationships and shared journey experience as community do life together.

  • Konara (Clan – Awabakal) series 5

    Depicting family connection and relationship across the generations, this vibrant and highly texture work tells the story of coming together for corroboree. Gatherings that share sorry business, celebrations, song, dance and storytelling across extended family clan groups and community. The three large textured symbols, central to the work depict our Elders, held in the highest regard within our communities and central to all facets of community wellbeing. A strong pathway extends horizontally across the piece connecting Elders and communities, depicting the passing on of knowledge and wisdom to younger generations. Interconnecting songlines woven within the work symbolise doing life together in extended community and highlighting unbreakable bonds that link us together across time and generations, connecting us as one proud people.

  • Kaling Kunta (Freshwater place – Awabakal) series 1

    This painting depicts, Pillapay Kullariaran, meaning valley of the palms, or Glenrock Lagoon, as many know it today, an intermediate freshwater creek located in Lake Macquarie. The artworks tells the story of the Awabakal people who had communal gatherings at the lagoon, depicted by the pathway connecting the water circle across the canvas. Located close to the beach and within rocky bush land, the artwork marks these country traits through use of natural bush and water colour. The vertical row of interchanging horizontal lines depict the various clan groups of the Awabakal who visited this fresh water place.

  • Koyiyoong (Campsite – Awabakal) series 1

    This vibrant artwork depicts the multiply journeys made across our great country by Aboriginal people and the known campsite available in this countries multi-landscaped tapestry. Lines flowing horizontally and vertically across the canvas symbolise the many song lines, journey trails and pathways taken by Aboriginal people over the generations, while the campsite is shown at bottom left with Elders, Men, Women and Children stopping to make camp. This artwork won the Coal and Allied’s Singleton Art Prize in 2014

  • Koyiyoong (Campsite – Awabakal) series 2

    This vibrant artwork depicts the journeys made across our great country by Aboriginal people along traditional paths to well-known campsites and meeting places interlaced within our countries multi-landscaped tapestry. This artwork pays tribute to our local meeting and campsite place Wollombi. Visited by the Awabakal, Wonaruah, Worimi and Darkinjung people for generations it is located in the Hunter Valley and still visited by many today. Vibrant coloured lines flowing horizontally and vertically across the canvas symbolise the many song lines, journey trails and pathways taken by Aboriginal people over the generations, while the campsite depicted by a meeting circle lays upon a specific path that flows upward across the canvas.

  • Bowan (Swamp Bird - Awabakal)

    The painting depicts the Bowan at home in the marshy swamp lands at sunset. The bowan gave its name to the site of Wallis Plains, in the vicinity of modern Maitland.

  • Colonisation

    The story of this artwork invites reflection on our history. Building blocks pressing up from the bottom of this work and spreading across the canvas represent the unstoppable march of progress. Set upon a massive all consuming wave in the backdrop of the work, like an overpowering presence, the blocks stretch forward threatening to engulf people, culture and country. While at the top of the piece we see opposing imagery raining down to challenge the onslaught of progress, an environment retaliating, emphasising the value in caring for country and ensuring the maintenance and protection of culture. Moving together toward closing the gap and bringing unity and shared vision toward reconciliation. The strong prevailing red tones are representative of the blood of our people, while the earthy tone in the work relate to country and the spasmodic injection of silver marking the relentless advancement technology of we witness today.


  • Ngooroowin Ngapaal (Emu Woman - Awabakal)

    This uniquely feminine image is found in Wonaruah country at the ‘Map Site’, Yengo National Park in the Hunter Valley. The Emu Women is engraved in rock alongside other highly significant and valued traditional Aboriginal artworks and stands as a sign post to the women’s birthing cave. Her hand depict that of an emu, with the middle finger the pointer from which flows the shape of the ridge to be followed to this site. This figure displays the womb and breast, both life giving with the many circles across the back and flowing down the arm being representative of the births that took place at this women’s place.

  • Kanto (Bush Tucker - Awabakal) series 3

    This artwork depicts the rich and vibrant bush tucker. From plant life through to berry, the blue/purples and orange/reds are depictive of our abundant native fruits, berries, nectars and foliage.

  • Bantimita (Message Sticks - Awabakal) series 2

    This artwork is symbolic of Aboriginal message sticks, depicted by the divided carved areas of the 3 main sections of the work. Message sticks were commonly used by our ancestors as one means of communicating between different Aboriginal tribes and nations. Messages were painted and inscribed on a stick, which was then transported by hand. One who carried the message stick was traditionally granted safe and protected entry to other nation's territory. The messages inscribed on the stick (by painting, carving, burning etc) were primarily "prompts" for the messenger so that the message would be conveyed consistently to each different nation's elders. Typical messages would be announcements of ceremonies, disputes, invitations, warnings, meetings, events and happenings.

  • Palii (Voice - Awabakal) series 2

    The artwork is symbolic of the voices of our ancestors and their influence across future generations.
    The interwoven, vibrate spirals speak loudly, reaching out from the canvas in the hope to capture the visual representation of sound, across the various tribal groups of our nation. The individual spirals that touch and subtly meld together depicts the diversity of the many tribal languages of our nation, while connecting our communities through the many similarities these languages (voices) share.

  • Borii (Song Line - Awabakal) series 1

    This earthy vibrant artwork depicts the multiply journeys made across our great country by Aboriginal people. Lines flowing horizontally and vertically across the canvas symbolise the many song lines, journey trails and pathways taken by Aboriginal people over the generations. This piece tells the specific story of the journey make from infant through to adulthood (initiation). The family clan group at the top right (depicting mother, father, child and elders refers to nurturing and growth). The family connection to the wide flowing song line weaving across the centre of the canvas depicts the journey made as we move into adulthood, while the meeting circle to the bottom right of the canvas symbolizes new beginnings, taking a role in society and new experiences.

  • Kayay (Move Along - Awabakal) series 1

    The huge canvas is the 1st painting of a twin set. Both this painting and its partner with brush stroke, flow, colour and design create movement and vibrancy which give the paintings life and activity. The fish in the picture represent my home ,in Awabakal country, on the shores of beautiful Ninkinpa (Lake Macquarie) where time on the water and fishing are a way of life.

  • Kayay (Move Along - Awabakal) series 2

    The 2nd painting of a twin set. Both this painting and its partner with brush stroke, flow, colour and design create movement and vibrancy which give the paintings life and activity. The fish in the picture represent my home, in Awabakal country, on the shores of beautiful Ninkinpa (Lake Macquarie) where time on the water and fishing are a way of life.

  • Middens

    This painting represents midden mounds, found around Australias’ waterways. The middens are huge hills that have grown over years of discarding shell from shellfish eaten by Aboriginal people. As this design is popular, I have produced a limited edition Midden artwork series. Each piece is unique, each piece is provided with a number authenticity certificate.

  • Puwama (Gather - Wonnarua)

    Puwama means to gather in the Wonnarua language. This painting shows the gathering together of the Wonnarua people. Wonnarua country takes in two large areas; Ninkinba (Lake Macquarie) and the Hunter Rivers.

    This artwork shows how the two come together or puwama (gather) for significant community and family events. This occurred in Wollombi, which was a central meeting place for the Wonnarua people, as well as other surrounding tribes. This area holds many significant Aboriginal sites and is still a place that Aboriginal people gather today. 

    As this design is popular, I have produced a limited edition Puwama artwork series. Each piece is unique, each piece is provided with a number authenticity certificate.

  • Parai (Country - Awabakal) series 2

    This artwork depicts the magnificent natural artistry and vibrant colour seen throughout the diverse landscapes of the Hunter. From the beachlands of Worimi to the rock art of Wollombi and the riches of coastal Awabakal. and Bahtahba. The work endeavours to captures the spirit, sound and beauty of our country.

    The colours and flowing designs used in this piece reflective of the ongoing movement and change to natures canvas, through time of day and season, across its multicolour soils, rock, coastlands and beach.

  • Wakool (Country together - Awabakal) series 1

    This vibrantly coloured artwork endeavors to capture and bring to life the beauty, diversity and connections of Aboriginal people, culture and country across our nation and time. Generations past, present and future are interwoven throughout the landscape of desert, bush land, waterways and coastline demonstrating strong connection to country and celebrating a people who greatly value family and community.

    Our people and community are depicted by the touching circles flowing across the canvas from right to left in an upward motion and have a threefold meaning:The central circles depicts past generations, our ancestors, while the expanding waves flowing outward from these circles symbolizes the sharing of stories and knowledge to future generations. Their prominent placement within the artwork and the bright colours used signify respect and the importance of passing on our cultural knowledge. Large circles at the top of the painting represent our community Elders/Leaders, clan groups and organizations, those who are now leading the way and role models to our youth.

    Our children and youth are depicted by the smaller circles at the bottom of the artwork. They appear to be moving upward on the canvas (changing colour) as they learn, grow and embracing their identity and culture. The landscape is evident throughout the piece in the textured design shaped to represent land and sea, as well as the rich reds and gold’s of our deserts and sand dunes, in the browns and oranges of our bush lands, the blues and greens of our waterways and the pinks and violet of our gorgeous sunsets.A beautiful people, A beautiful country.

  • Kintay (Happy - Awabakal)

    A painting about celebrating family. The circles are linked and interconnected to show the family members interaction and the strong ties that exist within Aboriginal family and community. The large circle represents family elders and the significant role they play as respected leaders and teachers (story tellers) within the family unit, while the smaller circles interwoven into the picture shows the links across many family lines (extended family ties). Many Aboriginal people have close family ties and have a very close link to cousins (similar to brothers and sisters). Even today it is not unusual for strong relationships with family members across 5 – 6 generations.

  • Spirit of the land

    This painting captures the spirit of our land. Depicted through the centre of the work, the expanding circles represent the strength and life of the spirit, as it upholds the people of our country. The highly textured waves interwoven across the piece symbolize our diverse landforms and the amazing vibrant colour we see across our sunburnt nation.